Advice

7 Bookstore Pick-Up Strategies

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According to Slate, bookstores are the place for bibliophiles to meet, fall in love, and even get engaged. Noted! Here are some pick-up strategies for the next time you find yourself browsing the shelves…

1. Choose The Right Bookstore!

The bookstore in the Slate article is an independent bookstore in Brooklyn, frequented by like-minded, book-loving youths. Stepping into a bookstore like that is sort of like stepping into a club, but not just because everyone loves books: everyone also hangs out in the same, trendy neighborhood, and probably has similar political leanings as well. These factors combine to make it a great pick-up place…

…whereas you probably won’t have as much luck at, say, the Borders at Penn Station, where what most people have in common is a desperate search for a clean bathroom.

2. Grab A Stack And Sit At The Cafe

The good news about big chains like Barnes and Noble is that their cafes are full of people just sitting there all day. ALSO, there are NEVER enough tables — perfect excuse to share with someone cute. [See Also: Coffee Shop Pick Up Strategies]

3. Don’t LURK

You can’t creepily do laps around the store, “pretending” to pick up a book now and then (but really stalking cute people). That is creepy. If you’re trying to pick someone up at a bookstore, I’d assume you genuinely like books? Go find one, and plant yourself in a chair. You can keep watch from there.

4. The “New Releases” Section Is The Best

People are much more likely to go to the new releases than “Military History” or other niche spot you could linger in. It’s also really easy to ask “Have you read this yet?” or, conversely, “Oh, I just read that, it was amazing, you should definitely get it!”

5. If You Want To Pick Up An Employee

You’re getting a gift for your Mom. She likes….fiction? Maybe? Keep it vague so the employee will spend a lot of time helping you find the perfect book.

6. Go To A Reading

Book readings are amazing — because they are free, because it’s something people very commonly and not-weirdly attend on their own, and because there’s a perfect built-in conversation topic. For popular authors, people often get to the readings two hours early: that’s two hours to sit around and be bored, aka easily make conversation with the other people around you! Often there is wine, and you can also easily strike up a conversation with the people in line waiting to get a book signed.

7. If It Goes Well…

Again, what big bookstores lack in personal charm, they make up for with built-in cafes. If you get in a great conversation with someone over a mutual favorite author, it’s easy to invite them to get a cup of coffee if it’s two aisles over. The more casual the better. If you AREN’T in a big bookstore, and don’t feel comfortable suggesting an impromptu date, just say something like “I’d love to get coffee with you sometime and talk about XX more!”