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4 Things Congress Doesn’t Know About Sex

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4 Things Congress Doesn't Know About SexSo it’s starting to feel like Congress really needs to take a class in Sex Ed, and Anatomy, and probably Etiquette as well. Admist the Rep. Todd Akin “legitimate rape” controversy, NY Mag has dug up a few interesting failed attempts by Congresspeople to make a statement about sex while backing up their claims with flawed scientific statements. While we appreciate the sentiment, maybe the men and women representing our states in Congress should do their homework before blurting out pretty overtly false statements. Here are 4 of the most obvious facts that our Representatives got wrong, but go look at NYMag‘s full article and see a few more that will make your WTF meter explode.

1

Abortion Doesn’t Cause Breast Cancer

Rick Santorum is known for being berated by the online community as he continuously spews blatantly erroneous jibber-jabber throughout his public appearances. In February, he spoke to Fox News regarding the Planned Parenthood/Susan G. Komer debate, stating that he doesn’t “believe that breast cancer research is advanced by funding an organization where you’ve seen ties to cancer and abortion” contrary to the research done by numerous accredited organizations denouncing the claim that abortions and breast cancer are linked.

2

The HPV Vaccine Hasn’t Been Found to Cause Retardation

Okay, so yes, numerous studies have been done about the HPV vaccine and its effects, none of which has proven that the shot causes mental retardation. But try telling that to Michele Bachmann, who publicly announced that a mystery woman in Florida told Bachmann that her daughter suffered from “mental retardation” after recieveing the injection.

3

The Morning After Pill and the Abortion Pill Aren’t the Same Thing

This is actually a pretty common misconception, no pun intended. This discrepency about the true function of each pill is most likely because of the lack of education available about these forms of contraception, without choosing to use one of them or purchase both for comparison. That being said, it doesn’t excuse the lack of research and correctness on the part of the Bachmann-Romney campaign opposing the, actually impossible, “morning after-abortion pill.” Plan B, aka the Morning After pill, is an emergency contraception that prevents egg fertilization, keeping the woman from becoming pregant in the first place. RU-438 is an abortion pill that does, in fact, terminate pregancies. While there is still debate on whether or not Plan B prevents a fertilized egg from being implanted, which is considered “abortion” by some conservatives, there is no scientific evidence to back it.

4

You Can Get AIDS Through Heterosexual Sex

AIDS through heterosexual sex? Preposterous! Tennessee state Sen. Stacey Campfield more or less announced his immence lack of understanding when it comes to contraction of AIDS on the radio. “My understanding is that it is virtually — not completely, but virtually — impossible to contract AIDS through heterosexual sex.”  I applaud you, Mr. Campfield, for being so wrong about this that it’s actually almost hilarious. Almost. According to the CDC, it is estimated that an astounding 12,860 people contracted HIV through heterosexual sex, in 2009. That’s one year. Virtually impossible? Mr. Campfield, you’ve got some ‘splainin to do.

[NYMag]

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