Pin it

Having an orgasm, as we all (hopefully) know, is a feeling akin to an explosion of pleasure Down Under. Have you ever thought about what happens in your brain, when climaxing? A group of scientists from Rutgers University did it for you.

These scientists studied the brain waves of a bunch of lucky (?) ladies while they masturbated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner (romantic!). These scanners recorded what happened to each brain when experiencing an orgasm – you could call it an orgasm-centric SFW short film. It’s pretty cool!

“It turned out to be the world’s first evidence of where orgasms occur in women’s brains,” lead scientist Barry Komisaruk told IFL Science. Why is this interesting? Because it isn’t happening in the area of the brain where scientists had previously thought. While it has always been noted that organisms reach the brain via a signal traveling up our spinal cord, this research proves that it gets there through the vagus nerve, a long nerve that extends into the pelvis.

Check out the video below.